How to write a good book report for middle school

how to write a good book report for middle school

How to Write a Great Book Report

for the report (see points next to each item). When you go to write your book report, be sure to include the information completed on the following pages. The final report must be typed and double spaced. Be sure to hand into your Reading teacher both this template and the book report when you return to school. Introductory paragraph - What is the name and author of the book on which you are . May 12,  · Put the name of the author. Indicate the time when the story takes place. Mention the location of the events taking place in the book. List the names of the characters briefly describing each one of them (at least those you will be discussing in the report.

One assignment has lasted the test of time, uniting generations of students in a common learning exercise: book reports. While many students dread these assignments, book reports can help students learn how to interpret texts and gain a broader understanding of the world around them.

S books can open your eyes to new experiences, people, places, and life situations that you may have never thought about before. In turn, a book report is a tool that allows you, the reader, to demonstrate that you have understood all the nuances of the text you just read. In the broadest terms, a book report describes and summarizes a work of fiction or nonfiction.

It sometimes — but not always — includes a personal evaluation of the text. In general, regardless of grade level, a book report will include an introductory paragraph that shares the title of the book and its author.

Students will often develop their own opinions about the underlying meaning of the texts through developing thesis statementstypically presented in the opening of a book report, and then using examples from the text and interpretations to support those statements. A good book report will address a specific question or point of view and back up this topic with specific examples, in the form of symbols and themes. Hod steps will help you identify and incorporate those important elements.

It shouldn't be too hard to do, provided you're prepared, and you can expect to spend, on average, days working on the assignment. Check out these tips to ensure you're successful:. The start of your book report provides an opportunity to make a solid introduction to the material and your own personal assessment of the work.

You how to make a homemade motor try to write a strong introductory paragraph that grabs your reader's attention. Somewhere in your first paragraphyou should also state the book's title and the author's name. High school-level papers should include publication information as well as brief statements about the book's angle, the genre, the themeand a hint about the writer's feelings in the introduction.

Henry Fleming is the main character of the book. As Henry watches and experiences wgite tragic events of the war, he grows up and changes his attitudes about life. Can you identify one experience that changed rsport entire view of the world around you? Henry Fleming, the main character in "The Red Badge of Courage", begins his life-changing adventure as a naive young man, eager to experience the glory of war. He soon faces the truth about life, war, and his own self-identity on the battlefield, however.

Appleton and Company inabout thirty years after the Civil War ended. In this book, the fpr reveals the ugliness of war and examines its relationship to the pain of growing up. Before you get started on the body of the report, take a few minutes to jot down some helpful information by considering the following points. In the vood of your book report, you will use your notes to guide you through an extended summary of the book.

You will weave your own thoughts and impressions into the plot summary. As you review the text, you'll want to focus on key moments in the storyline and relate them to the perceived theme of the book, and how the characters and setting all bring the details together.

You'll want to be sure that you discuss the plot, any examples of conflict that you encounter, and how the story resolves itself. It can be helpful to use strong quotes from the book to enhance your writing.

As you lead to your final paragraph, consider some additional impressions and opinions:. Conclude your report with a paragraph or two that covers these additional points. Some teachers prefer that you re-state the name and author of the book in the concluding paragraph. As always, consult your specific how to replace a key on a toshiba laptop guide or ask your teacher if you have questions about what is expected of you.

Share Flipboard Email. How to Write a Great Book Report. Grace Fleming. Education Expert. Grace Fleming, M. Updated October 11, Cite this Article Format. Fleming, Grace. Book Report: Definition, Guidelines, and Advice. ThoughtCo uses cookies to provide goood with a great user experience.

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Book Report Template

Responding to what you read is an important literacy skill. Here are 30 creative book report ideas designed to make reading more meaningful:. There are so many super creative, open-ended projects you can use mint tins for.

This teacher blogger describes the process of creating book reports and using them. Ask your students to create a yearbook based on the characters and setting in the book. What do they look like? Cut out magazine pictures to give a good visual image for their school picture. What kind of superlative might they get? Best looking? Class Clown? What clubs would they be in or lead?

Did they win any awards? It should be obvious from their small yearbooks whether your students dug deep into the characters in their books. They may also learn that who we are as individuals is reflected in what we choose to do with our lives.

This project would be perfect for a book tasting in your classroom! Each student presents their book report in the shape of food. See the sandwich and pizza options below and check out this blog for more delicious ideas.

Have students locate current event articles a character in their book might be interested in. Learning about how current events affect time, place, and people is critical to helping develop opinions about what we read and experience in life. In this project, each layer of this book report sandwich covers a different element of the book—characters, setting, conflict, etc.

A fun adaptation to this project is the book report cheeseburger. Choose alphabet books to help give your students examples of how they work around themes. Then ask your students to create their own Book Alphabet based on the book they read.

What artifacts, vocabulary words, and names reflect the important parts of the book? After they find a word to represent each letter, have them write one sentence that explains where the word fits in. Then they draw a head and arms on card stock and attach them to the board from behind to make it look like the main character is peeking over the report.

For your visual learner students, they can work on some of these cool lessons and projects to further understand a book where the setting is critical think Orphan Island by Laurel Snyder. Another fun and creative idea: create a wearable book report with a plain white tee. Create a new book jacket for your story. Include an attractive illustrated cover, a summary, a short biography of the author, and a few reviews from readers.

This is great for biography research projects. Students cut out a photocopied image of their subject and glue it in the middle.

Then, they draw lines from the image to the edges of the paper, like rays of sunshine, and fill in each section with information about the person. As a book report template, the center image could be a copy of the book cover, and each section expands on key information such as character names, theme s , conflict, resolution, etc. Dress up as your favorite character from the book and present an oral book report. If your favorite character is not the main character, retell the story from their point of view.

Another idea that works well for both nonfiction and fiction book reports. Each wedge of the pizza pie tells part of the story. Create a custom illustrated bookmark including drawings and words from either your favorite chapter or the entire book. This project really encourages creative thinking. Students read a book and write a summary. Then, they decorate a paper grocery bag with a scene from the book, place five items that represent something from the book inside the bag, and present the bag to the class!

Ask your students to think about a character in their book. What kinds of books might that character like to read? Take them to the library to choose five books the character might have on their to-be-read list. Have them list the books and explain what each book might mean to the character.

Also called a lap book, this easy-to-make book report hits on all the major elements of a book study and gives students a chance to show what they know in a colorful way.

Create a collage using pictures and words that represent different parts of the book. Use old magazines or print pictures from the internet. This image shows a 3-D model, but the link provides a lesson to show students how to glue four triangles together to make a 4-D model.

Create a timeline of the main events from your book. Be sure to include character names and details for each event. Use 8 x 11 sheets of paper taped together or a long portion of bulletin board paper. Students just need an ordinary clothes hanger, strings, and paper. The body of the hanger is used to identify the book, and the cards on the strings dangling below are filled with key elements of the book, like characters, setting, and a summary.

If a student has read a book about a cause that affects people, animals, or the environment, teach them about Public Service Announcements. Once they understand what a PSA is, have them research the issue or cause that stood out in the book. Then give them a template for a storyboard so they can create their own PSA. Some students might want to take it a step further and create a video based on their storyboard.

Consider sharing their storyboard or video with an organization that supports the cause or issue. Creative book report ideas think outside the box.

SO much information can be covered on the 12 panels, and it allows students to take a deep dive in a creative way. Make trading cards like baseball cards for a few characters from the book. On the front side, draw the character. On the back side, make a list of their character traits and include a quote or two. This clever book report is made from ordinary paper bags. Stack the paper bags on top of each other, fold them in half, and staple the closed-off ends of the bags together.

Students can write, draw, and decorate on the paper bag pages. They can also record information on writing or drawing paper and glue the paper onto the pages. The open ends of the bags can be used as pockets to insert photos, cut-outs, postcards, or other flat items that help them tell their story. Write a letter to the author of the book. Tell them three things you really liked about the story. Each illustrated bracelet charm captures a character, an event in the plot, setting, or other detail.

Create a list of ten facts that you learned from reading the book. This book report project is a low-tech version of a television made from a cereal box and two paper towel rolls. Students create the viewing screen cut-out at the top, then insert a scroll of paper with writing and illustrations inside the box.

When the cardboard roll is rotated, the story unfolds. What might the character have done differently? Elizabeth Mulvahill is an Elementary Teacher, writer and mom who loves learning new things, hearing people's stories and traveling the globe. You must be logged in to post a comment. Here are 30 creative book report ideas designed to make reading more meaningful: 1.

Fictional Yearbook Entries Ask your students to create a yearbook based on the characters and setting in the book. Posted by Elizabeth Mulvahill Elizabeth Mulvahill is an Elementary Teacher, writer and mom who loves learning new things, hearing people's stories and traveling the globe. All Posts. Leave a reply Cancel reply You must be logged in to post a comment. Get printables, teaching ideas, and tips just for your grade!

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